on Sat, 18 Oct 2014
For those requiring them, here is a link to my wishlists.
Wed, 15 Feb 2012 21:40
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Tue, 14 Feb 2012 00:15
Finished with The Citadel of the Autarch, by Gene Wolfe http://t.co/DLpM4Ra6
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Mon, 13 Feb 2012 10:07
Tor Books (2001), Edition: First Edition, Mass Market Paperback, 512 pages
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Mon, 13 Feb 2012 10:06
Ace (2009), Edition: Reprint, Mass Market Paperback, 576 pages
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Sun, 12 Feb 2012 23:00
Bantam Press (2012), Hardcover, 720 pages
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Sun, 12 Feb 2012 21:25
@mightymightytas: Have you found the "Never open this EVER" envelope? :D
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Sun, 12 Feb 2012 21:21
@mightymightytas: So, Risk Legacy is pretty awesome?
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Sat, 11 Feb 2012 12:53
Just got a call from Germany. (?) I didn't answer, and they didn't leave a message.
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Fri, 10 Feb 2012 14:02
87% done with Midnight Tides, by Steven Erikson http://t.co/c6BLvN4U
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Fri, 10 Feb 2012 13:29
@FourBrosStudio: Sounds a little like the popular game "Alchemy"? Regardless, it sounds awesome. Can't wait! #Taptitude #Craftitude
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Fri, 10 Feb 2012 10:00

by Salt-Man Z

Why throw the insert away? You can bag everything and still stash 'em in the slots easily enough.
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Thu, 09 Feb 2012 17:48

I’m not overly familiar with Magic: The Gathering. I know that it’s a fantasy card game in which players battle each other using custom-constructed decks. And it was a big deal back in high school. It originated the term to “tap”, or rotate, a card in play. And it was a huge influence on one of my favorite card games. That’s the extent of my knowledge.

I am, however, very much familiar with Matthew Stover. He happens to be one of my all-time favorite authors, and is the sole reason I picked up Test of Metal.

Now, tie-in fiction is a tricky animal: most of it just isn’t that good. I read a lot of Star Wars novels, but I enjoy them because they’re Star Wars, not because they’re necessarily well-written—and if I’m being honest, most of them really aren’t. So I read tie-in fiction primarily because I’m a fan of the larger shared universe it’s set in. But what about when I’m not? Can a favorite author make me care about a franchise I know nothing about?

Well, yes. And no.

From the (minimal) research I did after reading this book, I know that Test of Metal follows up directly on events in Agents of Artifice by Ari Marmell, another book in the Planeswalkers subseries. At the end of that book, the planeswalker (basically a type of wizard who can hop between different dimensions) Jace Beleren killed fellow planeswalker Tezzeret, ostensibly the “bad guy” of that novel. In Test of Metal, Tezzeret is not only resurrected, but is made the main viewpoint character. This is his story.

We start in media res with Tezzeret on an island made entirely of the magical metal, etherium. He is soon confronted by the powerful dragon Nicol Bolas, who, as it turns out, was responsible for recreating Tezzeret and sending him on a quest, of which this metal island is the end. Bolas then proceeds to trawl Tezzeret’s memories; subsequent chapters are the result of this mind-link, where the bulk of the novel’s story plays out in flashback, with Tezzeret as narrator.

Stover has loved playing with viewpoint and linearity in his Acts of Caine novels, and Test of Metal is no different. In addition to most of the chapters being flashbacks and narrated in the first-person by Tezzeret, we get additional first-person perspectives (one chapter each) from the other featured planeswalkers, Jace Beleren and Baltrice. And interspersed between those are the “present” goings-on at the metal island, related in standard third-person, from the POVs of both Tezzeret and Bolas. Alternating between the third- and first-persons is something Stover does extremely well, and its use suits the story perfectly. What I enjoyed perhaps the most, though, was how the book effectively begins at the end of the story. In fact, before I read the final chapter, I flipped back and reread the first chapter and had a couple of those great “Aha!” moments where the puzzle pieces start fitting together. But beyond just the structure of the novel, the story itself makes use of a limited amount of time travel in the form of a type of magic called “clockworking”; there’s a very nonlinear feel to entire book that’s simultaneously refreshing and bewildering, but Stover’s successful in keeping it all tightly under control.

If I had a main complaint, it would be that the story mostly boils down to a fairly-straightforward MacGuffin quest with powerful wizards throwing a bunch of magic at each other. And some of the dialogue is laughably juvenile—though as it more often that not also made me laugh in the good sense, I can overlook any quibbles there. In the end, it’s Stover’s handling of Tezzeret’s character and the internal journey he undertakes that elevate the book above the level of “mere” tie-in fiction. We get a bit of Tezzeret’s backstory, we come to understand his motivations, and watch as he undergoes both physical and internal transformations. He’s a fascinating character: highly intelligent, but not physically or magically overpowering, so he has to rely on his wits to get by. Plus, he’s also a bit of a smartass. Very much in Stover’s wheelhouse.

In fact, I enjoyed reading about Tezzeret so much that I really want to pick up Agents of Artifice just to get the first half (as it were) of the story. But I don’t think I really care enough about the Magic universe to bother doing so. Rather, I think I’ll just savor Stover’s contribution to it.

It’s not great literature, but it’s still better than most tie-in genre fiction deserves to be. It makes you use your brain. And it’s got all the classic Stover touches (warning: violence and strong language), plus plenty of twists and turns and double-, triple-, and quadruple-crosses. It’s great fun, and I’d recommend it to any fan of fantasy. [3.5 out of 5 stars]


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Thu, 09 Feb 2012 10:24

by Salt-Man Z

sedona14 wrote:

Are Priests of Ra and Ra the same game?

Same general game, mechanics-wise, but the tiles and the ways in which they're scored are completely different.
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Thu, 09 Feb 2012 09:53
Bantam Books (1976), Edition: First, Paperback
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Thu, 09 Feb 2012 09:47
Bantam Books (1975), Edition: Reprint Edition, Mass Market Paperback, 215 pages
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Thu, 09 Feb 2012 09:47
Bantam Books (1975), Mass Market Paperback, 879 pages
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Wed, 08 Feb 2012 13:23
@FourBrosStudio: I wonder, what's the max score in Fish Feeder w/out touching the screen? I'm just breaking 50K on avg now. #Taptitude
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Tue, 07 Feb 2012 15:16

by Salt-Man Z

Congrats on delurking, Mitch, and kudos for your generous offer. I'm another late-to-the-party 7W fan. Count me in!
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 16:44

by Salt-Man Z

I hadn't even heard of the game when a friend gave it to me for Christmas a couple years ago. It took me only two reads of the rulebook (one, really, but I reread to make sure) to get a complete understanding of the rules and mechanics. But I didn't "get" the game until my wife and I gave it our first play. It was a total n00b game that went overlong and saw us both playing horribly inefficiently, but we both saw the promise, and were fans from that moment forward. Though my wife's enthusiasm has cooled considerably after so many expansions, it remains one of my favorites.
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 15:18
RT @alyankovic: Christina Hendricks is Ginger. @ZooeyDeschanel is Mary Ann. #CastingTheGilligansIslandMovie
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 15:09
@jdiddyesquire @IcebergInkScott @nethspace @adribbleofink: Wow. Little-to-no-interest on my part has now become a firm "no interest".
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 13:30
Forge Books (2008), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 352 pages
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 13:28
Tor Books (2000), Edition: 1st, Mass Market Paperback, 416 pages
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Mon, 06 Feb 2012 00:08
Finished with Test of Metal, by Matthew Stover http://t.co/bNISIJyw
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Sun, 05 Feb 2012 13:30
@FourBrosStudio: The Lucky Charm upgrade in Heads Up is just a joke, right?
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Sat, 04 Feb 2012 14:30
@FourBrosStudio @saltmanz: I can indeed confirm: when you clear the last space in Mine Flagger using the Pro Tap, the game will not end.
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Sat, 04 Feb 2012 11:06
@FourBrosStudio @saltmanz: Yeah, I think it's the Pro Tap; I saved a single space 'til the end to dig normally, and it ended fine.
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Sat, 04 Feb 2012 10:38
@FourBrosStudio @saltmanz: I used the Pro Tap exclusively; I wonder if that has something to do with it?
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Sat, 04 Feb 2012 10:36
@FourBrosStudio: Um, how does a game of Mine Flagger end? I marked all 60 mines and cleared every other space but the clock's still running?
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Fri, 03 Feb 2012 15:05

by Salt-Man Z

Last I knew, they didn't have it in yet; next I hear about it, it's sold out? Bah.
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Thu, 02 Feb 2012 14:37

by Salt-Man Z

Heck, with two sets of the base game (and differently-colored wooden bits) you can play the Mayfair 2nd edition 8-player "peanut" map.
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Thu, 02 Feb 2012 10:40
On page 169 of 352 of Test of Metal, by Matthew Stover http://t.co/m6l4NOZg
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Thu, 02 Feb 2012 10:23
Ace (2012), Mass Market Paperback, 400 pages
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Wed, 01 Feb 2012 15:51

by Salt-Man Z

wmshub wrote:

You need pieces in 6 different colors, so it would be better to have the official expansion. Also the number discs are different in the 5 or 6 player game. But if you are willing to paint two sets of pieces and make your own number discs and find out the tile list for the larger island and the card distribution for more people...oh, probably best to just return one and get the expansion.

Good grief, it's not that hard:

Add 2 of each resource hex and 1 desert
Add 1 of each number disc
Add 1 sheep harbor and 1 3:1 harbor

For the resource cards, add 5 of each resource
For the dev cards, add 6 soldiers and 1 of each other non-VP card

There.
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Wed, 01 Feb 2012 08:53
On page 88 of 352 of Test of Metal, by Matthew Stover http://t.co/bD1eyPqJ
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Tue, 31 Jan 2012 15:32
DAW Hardcover (2012), Hardcover, 288 pages
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Tue, 31 Jan 2012 13:50

2012 Family Portrait

Date: March 25, 2012 12:50


tags:,,
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Tue, 31 Jan 2012 10:07
On page 50 of 352 of Test of Metal, by Matthew Stover http://t.co/v35r0nuV
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Mon, 30 Jan 2012 19:12
White Wolf Publishing (1997), Paperback, 418 pages
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Mon, 30 Jan 2012 19:12
Galaxy Press (CA) (2004), Paperback, 500 pages
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Mon, 30 Jan 2012 11:18

by Salt-Man Z

I can't recommend Innovation either, though I see why other people enjoy it; for me, there's just way too much stuff you have to account for, and the expansion just exacerbates that problem.

However, I just played Glory to Rome for the first time this weekend—the Cambridge version, two-player—and I absolutely loved it.
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Mon, 30 Jan 2012 10:25
Finished with The Sword of the Lictor, by Gene Wolfe http://t.co/gIAVPqlt
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Sun, 29 Jan 2012 10:24
Played GLORY TO ROME with @ravsitar last night, and was thoroughly impressed. Can't wait to play again!
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Sat, 28 Jan 2012 00:50
RT @darth_awesome: The best Nativity scene I have ever seen: http://t.co/DnQUC2c5
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Fri, 27 Jan 2012 12:07
Yesterday Alex told us how he learned about "Luther King George" in school.
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Fri, 27 Jan 2012 12:06

by Salt-Man Z

hadsil wrote:

I used to just shuffle all the blue cards together and pick 10, but I found it meant a lot of cards don't get used at all

This is why I don't shuffle used randomizers back into the randomizer deck until we've gone through all the cards.
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Thu, 26 Jan 2012 11:01
50% done with The Sword of the Lictor, by Gene Wolfe http://t.co/oHyVkFi6
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Wed, 25 Jan 2012 16:46
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Wed, 25 Jan 2012 13:34
Subterranean Press (2007), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 100 pages
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Tue, 24 Jan 2012 10:38
Finished with The Tomb (Adversary Cycle, #2), by F. Paul Wilson http://t.co/rnybJYGt
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Tue, 24 Jan 2012 10:15
Berkley (1996), Edition: Boulevard Edition, September 1996, Paperback, 1 pages
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Tue, 24 Jan 2012 10:15
Berkley (1997), Paperback, 240 pages
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Mon, 23 Jan 2012 11:00

by Salt-Man Z

I had been considering sleeving Dominion some time in the future (when I absolutely had to.)

Then we played through a copy of Mystery Rummy so much that it became necessary to sleeve the cards just to play, because the game is out of print. The sleeves (Mayday premiums) are so obnoxious, I've since changed my mind; I have no plans to sleeve any other game, ever, and the Base Cards expansion announcement makes me feel better about that decision.
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Mon, 23 Jan 2012 10:24
...that hang suspended in the air before collapsing inward, Kaylee stares at the screen with eyes wide and whispers, "It's so beautiful!"
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Mon, 23 Jan 2012 10:24
Every time I beat "The Imprisoned" monster in Zelda: Skyward Sword, when he explodes into a million glittering shards...
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Fri, 20 Jan 2012 15:43

by Salt-Man Z

apotheos wrote:

iNano78 wrote:

We all seem to be saying the same thing: The default strategy ("Big Money") is beaten by any "good" strategy.
Has anyone really demonstrated this? I've only ever heard it anecdotally, and as I only get to play with regular, non competitive players, I'll never have a chance to explore this myself.

I've played the Big Money strategy twice myself as was quite surprised at the speed of game end and the point spread.

It just sounds like a "good" strategy is being defined as "one that beats Big Money."
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 17:07

by Salt-Man Z

It's criminal that there's not one named reiner yet (or, in a pinch, knizia.)

And what about some love for the dude whose best game held the #1 spot for so long? How about seyfarth? (Or maybe sanjuan?)

And I totally want a server named dxv.
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 16:30
LucasBooks (2012), Hardcover, 256 pages
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 16:21
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 09:44
RT @RobbieMcDunc: Voyager traditional boys steak dinner... A farewell to Neelix who's moving back to NYC! We'll miss him!!! @StarTrek ht ...
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 00:04

SFBC Malazan bindings


tags:,,
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 00:04

SFBC Malazan spines


tags:,,
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 00:03

SFBC Toll the Hounds pages


tags:,,
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 00:03

SFBC Deadhouse Gates closeup

Date: January 18, 2012 23:03


tags:,,
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Thu, 19 Jan 2012 00:03

SFBC Deadhouse Gates pages


tags:,,
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Wed, 18 Jan 2012 10:49

by Salt-Man Z

The first time we played, we ran out the 10s in a 3-player game (partially thanks to my wife nuking everything.) I don't think we've made it to that Age since.
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Wed, 18 Jan 2012 09:55
On page 223 of 434 of The Tomb (Adversary Cycle, #2), by F. Paul Wilson http://t.co/wetFQ26B
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Tue, 17 Jan 2012 13:10

by Salt-Man Z

I'm going to guess that India doesn't come with 9 extra trains of the "non-standard" colors (white and purple)? Those who own both Nordic and Marklin will be fine, though.
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Tue, 17 Jan 2012 11:55
On page 521 of 960 of Midnight Tides, by Steven Erikson http://t.co/4a5X94a4
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Tue, 17 Jan 2012 11:13
Night Shade Books (2012), Edition: First Edition, Paperback, 376 pages
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Tue, 17 Jan 2012 10:00

by Salt-Man Z

Related Item: Catan Dice Game

Downloadable here: SMZ Catan Dice
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Tue, 17 Jan 2012 09:45
#TodayILearned: Daunte Culpepper has more Lambeau Field wins than Aaron Rodgers. Hunh.
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Mon, 16 Jan 2012 12:31

by Salt-Man Z

Screenshot of my Excel VBA implementation.
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Sun, 15 Jan 2012 23:10
On page 87 of 257 of The Sword of the Lictor, by Gene Wolfe http://t.co/ZIOFV9xf
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Sat, 14 Jan 2012 16:46
Walden Pond Press (2011), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 320 pages
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Sat, 14 Jan 2012 14:18
On page 82 of 434 of The Tomb (Adversary Cycle, #2), by F. Paul Wilson http://t.co/5M2DYl3p
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Sat, 14 Jan 2012 13:25
Tor Fantasy (2010), Edition: First Edition, Mass Market Paperback, 320 pages
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Fri, 13 Jan 2012 10:19
Shortest. Workday. Ever.
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Thu, 12 Jan 2012 13:43
Putnam Adult (1997), Hardcover, 127 pages
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Thu, 12 Jan 2012 11:28
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Thu, 12 Jan 2012 10:28
RT @emmrowland: RT @wstonesoxfordst: I saw the apostrophe on my way to work this morning. It's not looking too well. http://t.co/zVLKpTsy
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Wed, 11 Jan 2012 21:26
@FourBrosStudio Something screwy with Video Poker? I got a straight and a 3 of a kind, and each time the app immediately crashed. #Taptitude
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Wed, 11 Jan 2012 15:27
@FourBrosStudio: You wiped the Throwing Star stars/stats! (Except for Targets Hit, oddly.)
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Tue, 10 Jan 2012 17:20

Welcome to the first annual Salty Awards! I liked how last year’s “Best of 2010″ post turned out, so that’ll pretty much be the template for these awards. The main difference being, I’ve got a shiny new trophy now! Like last year’s Best Ofs, this is stuff that wasn’t necessarily published in 2011, just what I read the past year. And first reads only; re-reads don’t count. (Here’s a link to my 2011 reading list for reference.)


Statistics

First off, let’s start with some numbers, because who doesn’t love numbers?

Total books read: 51
Re-reads: 7
Non-series reads: 14
Nonfiction reads: 1
Novels by female authors: 3
Short story collections: 9
Reads that were also acquired in 2011: 21
Borrowed (unowned): 10

Interesting stuff, maybe, but not the real reason you’re here. Without further ado:


Best Short Story Collection 2011:

Runners-up:

5. Side Jobs by Jim Butcher
In the first half of 2010, I tore through the entirety of Jim Butcher’s fantastic Dresden Files series. I had to wait until fall of 2011 for the next installment, and decided to check out this short story collection (that I had skipped out on previously) in the meantime, particularly since it contained a story that took place between the previous book and the upcoming one. I’m glad I did, because Dresden shines in the short story format, and it was fun to read about the “side jobs” that take place before and between the books of the series. “The Warrior” might be my favorite Dresden story of all time.

4. Galactic North by Alastair Reynolds
The Revelation Space universe is an amazing place, and a large part of what gives it its charm is the sense of history with which Reynolds has imbued his books. This collection is a bit of an eye-opener in when you get to see just what the scope of his created fictional history is. Copious references to characters and events from his series make these stories mesh perfectly with those books, and perhaps the most impressive part is that main of them were written before the books. Beyond that, though, this is still a solid collection of awesome sci-fi stories.

2. (tie) Storeys from the Old Hotel and Strange Travelers by Gene Wolfe
I chickened out and put both these books in a tie for second place. You know I love me some Gene Wolfe, and ranking two superb collections by a favorite author is always hard, but beyond that, each collection showcases a different form: Travelers features a number of Wolfe’s longer-form stories, 15 in all, while Storeys tackles the shorter form, with over 30 inclusions. They’re two totally different animals, but at the same time, they’re both totally Gene Wolfe. It’s like picking your favorite child (and sure, you might actually have one, but you’ll never tell!)


And the best short story collection I read in 2011 is…

1. Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges
I adore Gene Wolfe (see above) and one of his largest influences is the Argentinian author Borges. Allusions to Borges’ work abound in Wolfe’s, and I had recently read The Shadow of the Wind which had its own share of Borgesian elements, so I knew I had to eventually get around to reading the original. Holy wow. It’s easy to see the parallels between Wolfe and Borges; Borges is what you might get if you took Wolfe and removed all the sci-fi and fantastical elements, stripped it down to the raw, crystallized ideas. And concentrated it. Mind-blowing stuff, is what it is. “The Garden of Forking Paths” is one of my favorite stories ever.


Best Comic Book 2011:


This might be a one-off category for this year, but I read a fair number of comic book collections, mostly thanks to Half Price Books. There were three worth singling out, and they are…

Runners-up:

3. Last Stand of the Wreckers by Nick Roche & James Roberts
This series had been hyped beyond all belief by the Transformers fanbase, so I was excited to finally lay my hands on a cheap copy of the trade paperback. It did not disappoint. This is the kind of book that shows just how great this franchise can be when put in the hands of people who really care about and understand it. It takes place in IDW’s current series continuity, but besides a couple of scenes, it’s entirely self-contained, and it draws heavily on obscure characters from all throughout franchise history, meaning you don’t have to be familiar with them to enjoy this book. If you’re a hardcore fan, or just interested in seeing how good TF storytelling can get, you need to pick up this book. Besides the original 5-issue series, the trade paperback also collects a related prose story by Roberts titled “Bullets” that’s just icing on the cake.

2. Welcome to the Jungle by Jim Butcher & Ardian Syaf
In the introduction to the graphic novel edition, Butcher explains that when writing the Dresden Files novels, he always pictured them in his mind as comic books. Which goes a long way toward explaining why this 4-issue original prequel series feels just like reading one of the novels. It’s pure unadulterated Dresden goodness, with all the trademark wit, magic, and monsters you’ve come to expect. And Ardian Syaf’s artwork is perfect: comic booky without being overly cartoony, and his characters—especially Harry Dresden himself—are spot-on.


And the best comic book I read in 2011 is…

1. Echo by Terry Moore
I have Tor.com and Stephen Aryan to thank for this one. After his write-up of this series, I just had to check it out, and was able to find 4 of the 6 available collections for cheap on eBay. Later I sold them and sprung for the Complete Edition containing all 30 issues, and let me tell you that is a beast of a book. And it’s amazing. Moore’s black-and-white artwork is gorgeous, his characters—their personalities and expressions and interactions—all fully realized, and he still manages to throw a bunch of slam-bang action into the mix. Almost impossible to put down.


Best Novel 2011:


Man oh man oh man this was tough; I read a lot of really good books this past year. (Titles link to my reviews.)

Runners-up:

5. The Crippled God by Steven Erikson
This was the big one, the final volume in the 10-book Malazan Book of the Fallen, perhaps the most ambitious fantasy series ever attempted, and the series responsible for my participation in various book cataloging sites and online forums, and thus also for my reading habits for the past half-decade. In those 5 years I’d read all of the previous books, re-read most of them, and discussed them all ad nauseum, and this capped it all off. It was exhilarating and bittersweet at the same time, bringing the decalogy full circle and tying (most) things up eventfully, emotionally, and thematically. It wasn’t perfect, but then, that’s fitting, too.

4. Old Man’s War by John Scalzi
This was on my “I really need to read books by this guy” list, and I finally picked it up over Christmas of 2009. I haven’t read any Heinlein—outside the fairly crappy The Cat Who Walks Through Walls but people compare this book to Heinlein’s work a lot. It reminded me a lot of Card’s Ender’s Game, but mostly in a “sci-fi you’d recommend to a friend whose never read sci-fi before” way. The first-person narrative is fabulous, hilarious, and moving, and the action is gritty and frantic and very very real. All around, a very enjoyable, very human book.

3. Peace by Gene Wolfe
Yes, I love Gene Wolfe. Shut up. It feels weird to write a book review that basically goes, “I don’t understand this book, but I love it.” So it is with this one. A book of Midwestern memoirs doesn’t seem like it would be my thing, but Wolfe’s writing is so gorgeous, so eminently readable, but also quite haunting; and the sinister undercurrents that never quite reveal their true nature (at least on a first read) make this an absolutely fascinating book.

2. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Scott recommended this one to me as his favorite book, and I trust his judgement, and hey, I found it for $2, too. It’s worth the cover price, though; this is one lush and luscious novel full of romance and mystery (and a tinge of horror) and absolutely dripping with atmosphere. It’s a book for book lovers, and for lovers of fine storytelling in general.


And the best novel I read in 2011 is…

1. Embassytown by China Miéville
Like Scalzi, I had never read any of Miéville’s work before, but that changed when I won a review copy of his upcoming Embassytown. Talk about being blown away; this book was amazing. All of my favorite sci-fi elements were present: well-developed, alien aliens, cultural clashes, intrigue, mystery, unconventional narrative structure, jaw-dropping revelations, and plenty of Big Ideas and musings on the nature of language and thought. I read a lot of reviews that basically gave it a thumbs-down, and I it’s like I can’t even decipher the words being written; it makes no sense at all to me. This was easily the best book of 2011, and one of the best books I’ve had the pleasure of reading, period.

Honorable mentions: Dissolution by C. J. Sansom, The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall, The Breach by Patrick Lee, Reamde by Neal Stephenson



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Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21
@TeresaFrohock @IcebergInkScott @jdiddyesquire @DougHulick @civilianreader Bought it last year. One of these years I'll get to reading it...
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Tue, 10 Jan 2012 13:36
@IcebergInkScott: I'm just teasing, of course, but if Gene Wolfe could be said to have a shtick, it'd be the unreliable narrator.
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Tue, 10 Jan 2012 13:27
@IcebergInkScott @jdiddyesquire @TeresaFrohock @DougHulick @civilianreader: Then how on Urth have you not read Wolfe yet?! ;)
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